More than seven million Kashmiris remain suffocated by the Indian government. The curfew that went into effect on 5 August is still in place. The media is not able to get into the state and offer a report of the situation. Despite the production of a state of fear, brave people have come out on the streets to protest the situation. Meanwhile, on 12 September, thousands of people took to the streets across Sudan to call for the ouster of the chief justice and the attorney general. They have said that they want to see a more civilian character to the government. Faced with the determination and heroic continuation of the mass protest movement and the support of junior officers, the military junta has had to accept compromises. The military is not prepared to fully crush the movement because many junior, non-commissioned officers are sympathetic to its goals. This does not mean that the military has not used violence. It has. But the alliance has been resilient. For them, the revolutionary process has not ended.

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In the Ruins of the Present traces the challenges posed by globalization and what these challenges produce for our society. The first attempt to address the problems of globalization was neo-liberalism. It failed. Next came cruel populism, which expresses itself in narrow, hateful terms. It will also fail. The Left is weak – decomposed by globalization. The need of the hour is for the Left to recompose itself, to become a vital force for a fragile humanity.

Globalisation and Its Alternative lays out Samir Amin’s assessment of the concept of globalisation as well as his concept of ‘de-linking;’ that is, for the Third World to compel imperialism to accept its conditions and to be able to drive its own policy. Amin’s perspective helps us understand the current crisis of capitalism and imagine a world based on a multi-polar, internationalist people’s agenda, rather than one driven by global capital.

Raw minerals are needed for everyday life, but when that life is also the cost of our infrastructural needs it is time to start asking questions. Why do 60% of the world’s mining companies have their headquarters in Canada? In this briefing we provide the financial details of ten Canadian mining companies. This data becomes a corporate crime rap sheet when it is read alongside concise accounts of the most horrendous violations committed–globally–by these companies. Canadian wealth is deeply dependent on a depraved indifference to human life, an indifference seemingly shared by Canadian mining companies.

On 12 September, thousands of people took to the streets across Sudan to call for the ouster of the chief justice and the attorney general. They have said that they want to see a more civilian character to the government. Faced with the determination and heroic continuation of the mass protest movement and the support of junior officers, the military junta has had to accept compromises. The military is not prepared to fully crush the movement because many junior, non-commissioned officers are sympathetic to its goals. This does not mean that the military has not used violence. It has. But the alliance has been resilient. For them, the revolutionary process has not ended.

The Industrial & Commercial Workers’ Union (ICU) – a trade union, rural peasant movement, and urban squatters’ movement – formed on the docks in Cape Town in 1919. Within a decade, the ICU had expanded across Southern Africa without regard for national borders and counted people from various African countries and the Caribbean in its leadership, as well as people who were Indian and mixed race. The largely forgotten history of the ICU is well worth recovering in a time of escalating chauvinism and xenophobia. Our Dossier #20 offers an introduction to this extraordinary popular movement.

Our first red alert — a brief two-page assessment of key crises that can be easily printed out and distributed — is on Kashmir to help shed light on the current conflict and human rights violations. Kashmir is fundamentally contested, each acre claimed by one or the other neighbouring country.

Frustration with the resilience of Iran and with its ties to China and Russia have pushed the regional allies of the US – and the US itself – to renew threats against Iran. The hybrid war against Iran has included economic sanctions, sabotage, and assassinations, as well as an information war. To break through the information barrier, Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research interviewed Professor Mohammed Marandi of the University of Tehran. This conversation focuses on the unilateral US sanctions policy against Iran, on Iran’s resilience, and on Iranian relations with China and Russia.

In the face of increasing neoliberal policies, the working-class movement in India has seen several major general strikes. Our eighteenth dossier – an interview with K Hemalata, President of the Centre of India Trade Unions – discusses the challenges and struggles facing the Indian working class and how they are able to organise workers who initially were apprehensive and afraid to join working class movement.

Dossier no. 17 reflects on the hybrid war unleashed against Venezuela. We document the repertoire of tactics, but also the motives behind them. We are interested not only in the recent attack on Venezuela, but in the similarities between this attack and others in Latin America over the past decades. This general onslaught in Latin America needs to be understood not in terms of the war against this country or that one, but in terms of the method of domination that shape the current neo-liberal and imperialist offensive in the region.